Books about Frida Kahlo: Biographies of Her Life for Kids (Lessons on Frida Kahlo)

Biography of Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo, Mexico’s greatest female painter, was born in 1907, was born by the name of Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón. She explored self-portraits, mixing realism and fantasy in her work. Her artwork represented Mexican cultural traditions as many of its themes.

Kahlo was painting up until her death in 1954. She is also famous for her marriage, to another successful and famous painter, Diego Rivera.

 

 

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Books about Frida Kahlo, Mexican Artist and Painter

The Story of Frida Kahlo: A Biography Book for New Readers, by Susan P. Katz

This Frida Kahlo biography book for kids looks into the life of Frida Kahlo, Mexico’s most famous painter.

This book is written in very easy-to-understand language, and walks through the politics and history of Frida Kahlo’s life. It discusses the Mexican Revolution, the government of Mexico in the early 1900s. It is written like a quality Wikipedia article directly created for kids, with picture book illustrations on every page (perfect for an early reader of chapter books.)

Frida Kahlo: The Artist Who Painted Herself, by Margaret Frith

Frida Kahlo was a painter, and this biography of her is written from the perspective of a child doing a report on her. As such, it’s very approachable for children reading it. This biography is easy-to-read for independent readers wanting to learn more about Frida Kahlo. The book includes the painting of Frida Kahlo’s family tree, which parents or teachers might want to pre-screen before showing a class.

Frida Kahlo, by Mike Venezia

This book is written as a biography, with cartoon stories and dialogues filling the margins of each page. The focus of this book is on Frida Kahlo and her art.

Frida Kahlo: The Artist in the Blue House, by Magdalena Holzhey

This celebration of Frida Kahlo’s art style focuses in on her symbolism.  It looks at the use of images like parrots, family members, trees, deer, friends, a blue house, flowers, the sun and the moon. It is a picture book that older elementary students will also enjoy as they took a look at how the local aspects of Mexico found their way into the artist’s work.

Who Was Frida Kahlo? by Sarah Fabiny

This book from the Who Is? series covers the life of Frida Kahlo in a biography for early chapter book readers (ages 7 to 12). The book is also good and has been reviewed by many adults wanting a shorter read on Frida Kahlo for themselves.

The book contains one page of illustrations that has artwork nudity – the page can be covered if needed for the situation.

 

 

 

 

 

Frida Kahlo in Videos

This is a video about Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera by Khan Academy. It covers her self portrait, “Frieda and Diego Rivera”, which was purposefully spelled as Frieda. For people wanting to get a bit of art history through video online, it’s a good watch.

This TedEd video goes into the Woman Behind the Painting, covering Frida Kahlo’s life and biography.

 

Frida Kahlo Quotes

Frida Kahlo is also famous for her words:

Frida Kahlo Quote:      Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?

Frida Kahlo Quote:       I never paint dreams or nightmares. I paint my own reality.
Frida Kahlo Quote:      I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best.

Quote Analysis: What do these quotes by Frida Kahlo mean? What feelings do you think they convey? Does she sound happy or sad? Hopeful or in dispair? A realist or a dreamer?

 

 

What have you learned from these biographies of Frida Kahlo? Have you found a good children’s book about Frida Kahlo?

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